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Citrix today announced a limited technology preview of virtualized Linux apps and desktops that integrates with XenApp and XenDesktop and extends the FlexCast Management Architecture (FMA) to enable additional use cases in industries such as automotive, manufacturing, oil and gas and financial services. When used with Citrix HDX, the company’s market-leading user experience technology, customers will get unmatched performance and bandwidth efficiency for people accessing Linux desktops from any device, over any network. In the future, the HDX technology for hosted Linux apps will continue to evolve to enable even the most demanding GPU-based graphics applications. People interested in participating in the Citrix Linux Virtual Delivery Agent (VDA) Tech Preview to test and provide feedback on this project may submit an application at http://now.citrix.com/LinuxPreview... (more)

IBM Taps Global Network of Innovation Centers to Fuel Linux on Power Systems for Big Data and Cloud Computing

CHICAGO, Aug. 22, 2014 /PRNewswire/ -- At the LinuxCon North America conference today, IBM (NYSE: IBM) announced it is tapping into its global network of over 50 IBM Innovation Centers and IBM Client Centers to help IBM Business Partners, IT professionals, academics, and entrepreneurs develop and deliver new Big Data and cloud computing software applications for clients using Linux on IBM Power Systems servers.  Last year IBM committed $1 billion in new Linux and open source technologies for its Power Systems servers including the opening of five new Power Systems Linux Centers in Beijing, China, New York, New York, Austin, Texas, Montpelier, France and Tokyo, Japan.  Today over 1500 ISV applications are available for Linux on Power, fueled in part by work performed at these centers. IBM is adding Power Systems Linux services to its Innovation and Client Centers t... (more)

Sun Introduces Netra Dataplane Software Suite for the Telecom Market

Sun Microsystems has introduced its Netra Dataplane Software (NDPS) Suite for the telecom market. Sun's new software is the first standardized tool to quickly and efficiently deliver dataplane applications for the aggregation, transport and routing of voice, video, and data for the telecommunications network. NDPS, which runs on Sun's Netra CoolThreads servers, makes it faster and less expensive for telecom customers to develop and deploy packet processing throughout the network. "By delivering the first high-performance packet processing engine on Sun's CoolThreads servers, we are showing that Sun's general purpose OpenSPARC processors are ideal for pervasive IP networks," said Raju Penumatcha, vice president, Netra Systems and Networking, Sun Microsystems. "NDPS along with the Solaris 10 Operating System (OS) on CoolThreads will dramatically cut costs and time to ... (more)

Is IT Outsourcing Worth It?

Over the past 20 years the economy has lost over four million jobs. Although some of these jobs have disappeared because of increased productivity, most of them have been exported overseas to countries with low-cost labor such as China and Pakistan. As the world becomes smaller, high-tech services have soon followed. Forrester Research, in a much-quoted study issued late last year, estimated that 3.3 million jobs representing $136 billion in wages would move overseas from the United States by 2015. Everything from computer programming to chip design to support will be affected, moving to countries like India, Poland, China, and the Philippines, according to the study. Think about it - $136 billion, roughly the entire GNP of Indonesia. In only 20 years America has gone from being the mother of invention to the world leader in high-tech job exports. Not long ago, "high-... (more)

McNealy: "Sun Does Not Favor Mega-Mergers"

According to Sun, its mergers and acquisitions – unlike Oracle's, Adobe's, and AT&T's – aren't quick fixes aimed at instantly growing its customer base. They're "thoughtful, strategic acquisitions that complement and enhance our historic strengths." Sun Microsystems, McNealy claims in a memo sent to Sun's customers this week, takes a different approach from the rest of the industry giants. But hold on. Sun has completed no fewer than nine acquisitions during the past three years. McNealy points out as much in his memo. So what's so different between its approach and the approach of, say, Adobe/Macromedia, Oracle/PeopleSoft, HP/Compaq, and the pending AT&T/SBC deal? According to McNealy, it's this: "Our team ... looks to acquire companies that will give Sun a strategic advantage in terms of intellectual property, new technologies, and human capital. We are looking ... (more)

Sun Charts New Territory For Open Source With OpenSPARC Project

Sun Microsystems, Inc. announced the OpenSPARC project to open source its new breakthrough UltraSPARC(R) T1 processor design point. Sun also announced plans to publish specifications for the UltraSPARC-based chip, including the source of the design expressed in Verilog, a verification suite and simulation models, instruction set architecture specification (UltraSPARC Architecture 2005) and a Solaris OS port. The goal is to enable community members to build on proven technology at a markedly lower cost and to innovate freely. The source code will be released under an Open Source Initiative (OSI)-approved open source license. With this ground breaking move to open source the UltraSPARC T1 code, Sun hopes to spur innovation for massively-threaded systems and “system-on-a-chip” design through increased participation in processor architecture development and ... (more)

Sun Reveals Open Source Plans for Niagara Chip

While it was busy launching its new Niagara-based servers in New York Tuesday, Sun Microsystems said it would open source the UltraSparc T1 processor that was code named Niagara. It's calling the project OpenSparc. At this point it's more a statement of intent than a fait accompli. The program isn't supposed to kick off until late in the first quarter after Sun addresses key issues such as implementation and governance. Back in 1999 Sun released its complete MicroSparc IIep design for free under the Community Source License, also used for Java to try to make its chip designs more popular. Companies that used and sold the embedded chip were supposed to pay Sun 3% of the average selling price by way of royalty but would have saved hundreds of thousands in licensing fees. Again Sun it apparently hopeful of triggering a few derivatives. It claims the idea behind OpenSparc i... (more)

GPS

Back in 1957, US scientists tracking the first Russian satellite, Sputnik, noticed that they could use the Doppler effect to work out exactly how far away it was. Since they knew where they were they could use that information to work out where the satellite was, and from there it’s a small step to realizing that if you know where the satellite is then you can work out where you are. It wasn’t until 1978 that the US launched the first experimental Earth-positioning satellite, and it was 1993 before the array of 24 satellites, which were needed for accuracy and global coverage, were ready for use. Now, in 2006, we can finally use this multibillion-dollar plethora of technology to calculate how far we jogged this morning and the best route to the liquor store, with the US government spending $400 million a year to keep our jogging records accurate! Of cour... (more)

Think Linus Torvalds Will Defer to Sun on GPLv3? The Answer May Hinge on a Bottle of Wine

Linux creator Linus Torvalds thinks the last GPLv3 draft is better than earlier drafts, but he still doesn't like it much, preferring the existing GPLv2 that the Linux kernel is currently licensed under. He has problems with the GPL 3's ban on so-called "tivoization" - Tivo shuts down if users mess with its DRM software - and deals like the Microsoft-Novell pact. " All I've heard are shrill voices about 'tivoization' (which I expressly think is OK)," he wrote Sunday on the Linux development mailing list, "and panicked worries about Novell-MS (which seems way overblown, and quite frankly, the argument seems to not so much be about the Novell deal, as about an excuse to push the GPLv3)." However, he told the mailing list that he might move to GPLv3 if Sun puts OpenSolaris under the GPLv3 like it's been saying it wants to so it can have a standard license. "I have yet... (more)

Orchid Technologies Designs LORAN Software Receiver

Orchid Technologies on Ulitzer Built for flexibility and power, the 500MHz TMS320C6713 provides high performance floating point processing to make the receiver highly configurable. The analog front-end design with variable gain and ‘Q’ is perfect for changing conditions on land and sea. The highly selective system provides software controlled gain selection over 120dB of dynamic range. “This receiver represents a breakthrough in performance and power,” says Paul Nickelsberg, President and Senior Engineer at Orchid Technologies. “High speed floating point digital processing makes amazing things possible.” About Orchid Technologies Orchid develops custom electronic products for OEM’s. Orchid has successfully completed hundreds of electronic product designs. Orchid offers its clients a skillful blend of innovative hardware and software design with practical producti... (more)

Cougar Point Fallout

After Intel disclosed its billion-dollar Cougar Point chipset flub Monday, Samsung said it will offer the people who bought 2,000-3,000 of its PCs that carry the tainted widget a refund or exchange on Intel's dime. NEC told Bloomberg that it would probably delay shipping four new models. HP has canceled a business notebook announcement scheduled for February 10, stopped making desktops and laptops with the chip and halted shipments. It's offering refunds or exchanges. Dell's got kit impacted in its XPS, Vostro and Alienware lines and has halted production. It will either take machines back or replace the motherboards when it gets the fixed chipset from Intel. Asustek reportedly shipped a lot of product and is recalling it. According to Bloomberg it expects its February revenues to be off by $35 million. Apple is reportedly unaffected. Well, at least it's not saying ... (more)